“Le Corrèze avant le Zambèze”: Futures, Presents, and Directions in French History

This is a repost from the French History Network Blog In this sixth post in a series of reflections on the New Directions in French History Conference in London in September, Andrew WM Smith (UCL) reflects on the connections between past and future in the work of doing history.   Thinking about New Directions in French History meant asking big questions about the discipline. It led me back … Continue reading “Le Corrèze avant le Zambèze”: Futures, Presents, and Directions in French History

REPOST: French History @ IHR: Roundtable discussion of Emile Chabal’s ‘A Divided Republic: Nation, State and Citizenship in Contemporary France’

This blog (written by me) was originally posted on the French History Network Blog http://frenchhistorysociety.co.uk/blog/?p=633   Date & Place: Monday 5 October, at the IHR, London. Speakers: Emile Chabal (Edinburgh) with responses from Julian Jackson (QMUL), James McDougall (Oxford), Claire Eldridge (University of Leeds) and David Priestland (Oxford) Paper Title: A roundtable discussion of Emile Chabal’s ‘A Divided Republic: Nation, State and Citizenship in Contemporary France’ Chair: Iain Stewart (QMUL)   … Continue reading REPOST: French History @ IHR: Roundtable discussion of Emile Chabal’s ‘A Divided Republic: Nation, State and Citizenship in Contemporary France’

REBLOG: A History of Violence: Understanding Narratives of Terror

This post originally featured on the French History Network Blog. Visit their site for more great content. The violence which marred French streets last week cannot be understood outwith historical context. Its very horror lies in its spontaneity, in its mundane settings, and in the obscurity of its perpetrators. The shootings that occurred in Paris were not counter-hegemonic violence. They were not coherent political messages. … Continue reading REBLOG: A History of Violence: Understanding Narratives of Terror

2014: A Year in Review

On reflection, 2014 offered opportunities and disappointments, as it did for all. I’m writing this not necessarily for readership, though perhaps instead as a cathartic exercise. I’ve divided it into 3 sections, to make it more accessible and to help me divide my thinking: Publications and Research, Teaching and Employment, and Personal. As I’m writing this, I’ve realised it is over-long, navel-gazing and perhaps a … Continue reading 2014: A Year in Review

REBLOG: Scribblers United: The Unexpected Joys of Doodling

This post originally featured on the French History Network Blog. Visit their site for more great content. As a contemporary historian, I don’t see many illuminated manuscripts. I don’t see many handwritten sources either, if I’m honest. Much of what I end up looking at is in the tidy, typewritten order of the 1940s and beyond. One of the most unexpected joys, therefore, is discovering … Continue reading REBLOG: Scribblers United: The Unexpected Joys of Doodling